Needs Assessment Report

Needs Assessment Report

Oct 31, 2019 Uncategorized by

Health Education Associate HEDU 4420: Seminar & Internship Needs Assessment Report Introduction • The target population for the health education associate (HEA) needs assessment is African American males 10-18 years of age living in east Durham North Carolina. The HEA chose African American males 10-18 years as the target population due to them leading the homicide rate in Durham County. The median income in Durham North Carolina is $50,997. In east Durham the median income is around $15,000 to $21,000 which is severely below the average income. In East Durham African Americans make up most of the population. Durham North Carolina has a population of 288,133 residents, of that 63,389.3 residents are younger than 18 years of age. Methodology • To conduct the needs assessment, the HEA analyzed peer reviewed articles both qualitative and quantitative, Durham County Health Report, information from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website, Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and the Durham Police Department Annual Report. To gather primary data for the needs assessment the HEA interviewed 10 participants, which consisted of African American male freshmen students at North Carolina Central University (NCCU) and gatekeepers (important community leaders). The HEA conducted a windshield tour in East Durham North Carolina. Each of these methods used by the HEA were crucial to figuring out the severity of youth violence in East Durham North Carolina. • To retrieve primary data on the target population the HEA interviewed a reverend, doctor, two professor, and six NCCU freshmen African American male students from the Durham community. Participants were obtained in a non-randomized fashion through recommendations (e.g. purposive sampling, snowball sampling). The interviews were conducted to assess the need for a violence prevention program among African American youth. • The HEA attended meetings at Shepard’s House UMC Fellowship Hall called Religious Coalition for a Nonviolent Durham. Several topics where discussed at the meetings the HEA attended such as “The Furniture Project of Durham” and the building of a light rail train that will cause displacement of many low income family’s living in East Durham North Carolina. Further, at the meeting they also discussed Absentee fathers and the effects that has on a family such as increased rates of depression, lower average incomes, and increased rates of violence in households. • The health education associate (HEA) conducted a windshield tour in East Durham North Carolina. The HEA drove around with Tia Willis, a college student in the Department of Public Health Education. Some negative findings from the windshield tour included multiple boarded up houses, cracks/potholes in the middle of the street, and stray dogs which could be a danger to the public. Further, there were no grocery stores or food establishments in the area which makes East Durham technically a food dessert. Some positive findings from the windshield tour included Holton Career and Resource Center, mini library, The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club which has East way Elementary School right next to it, and multiple religious congregations. The windshield tour showed that East Durham has the potential to flourish once an adequate amount of resources and businesses are put into the area. Findings • Homicide rates in 2010 among non-Hispanic, African American males 14-18 years of age (51.5 per 100,000) exceeded those of Hispanic males (13.5 per 100,000) and non-Hispanic, White males in the same age group (2.9 per 100,000) (CDC, 2013). • Homicide is the number one leading cause of death for African American male’s ages 14 to 18 years of age in North Carolina and Durham County (U.S. Census, 2010). • Youth violence detrimental to the individuals involved as well as the communities that they live in. The current economic impact of youth violence is approximately 14.1 billion dollars in combined costs from medical care and work loss productivity (CDC, 2013). • Violence is a major problem among African American male youth due to multiple socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors such as lack of education, impoverished background, dysfunctional family, weapon carrying, involvement with drugs, alcohol, or tobacco use, and poor behavior control (CDC, 2013). • According to the Durham county YRBS results for 2013, 47 percent of African Americans reported to carry a weapon such as a gun, knife, or club on school property (YRBS, 2013). • According to the Durham county YRBS results for 2013, 69 percent of students reported that they had missed an average 2-3 days, because they felt unsafe at school or on the way to school (YRBS, 2013). • The HEA learned that at the turn of the 20th century, East Durham was a blue-collar neighborhood, where thousands of textile workers made a good living under the employ of the Durham Cotton Manufacturing Company. Following, World War II, East Durham underwent a long period of decline that reached its apex in the 1980s and ’90s, when the town was overrun by drugs and crime. East Durham wasn’t always an impoverished neighborhood (Old House magazine, 2009). • The HEA discovered from the interviews, that Youth violence is important topic. Participants felt that some of the causes for youth violence were negative observational learning from television and the internet, lack of positive male role models, and too much emphasis on sports and not education. Participants also felt that violence is becoming a social norm in our society and that it is highly acceptable to be violent as means to make money. • From the interviews the HEA discovered that participants felt that churches are not using the money that they receive from the community in a positive way and if they are it’s not showing in the community’s or in the church. • Based on the participants responses male mentors and evidence based strategy’s should be included in a violence prevention program. • During the Religious Coalition For a Nonviolent Durham meeting the Real Durham initiative which was spoken of as a congregation in action, that utilizes the innovative, evidence based strategy’s to try and reduce poverty Conclusions • Top 4 to 5 social problems among African American males 10-18 years of age o Lack male role models o Poor family functioning o Gang involvement o Observational learning from negative imagery on television, bad role models in the community, and the Internet o Bullying o Absentee father • Top health problems of African American males ages 10-18 o Homicide o Unintentional injury o Suicide o Obesity o Malignant Neoplasms Assets/Resources and Capacity The current capacities in the community right now are local faith based groups, schools, library, mentoring centers, and police presence in the community. There was a total of 11 faith based organizations near East Durham. Although participants reported that they mistrust religious congregations, they could serve as a great platform to raise awareness about multiple health issues. Further, other assets include schools such as East way Elementary School and Holton Career and Resources Center in East Durham, North Carolina. The library in East Durham served as a place for residents in the area to read books. The Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club serve as a great facility to keep youth out of trouble. There is also a several parks located in East Durham, but that is where a lot of the violent acts take place in the community according to the interviews with participants. Durham County Police department has presence in the neighborhood; however the lack of mistrust for the cops causes friction between the law enforcement and residents in the community. Use of Data The data collected from the HEA needs assessment will help guide his special project. The HEA will utilize the information to express the issue of youth violence. The HEA now knows what socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors attribute to youth violence such as lack of education, impoverished background, dysfunctional family, weapon carrying, involvement with drugs, alcohol, or tobacco use, and poor behavior control. The HEA can now use M-Powerhouses current multidisciplinary model which consist of: the youth symposium and the M-Powerhouse Interactive life skills curriculum to address the issues uncovered from the needs assessment. The HEA will now know what resources are available to assist the efforts to decrease violent behavior among African American youth such as faith based groups, mentoring centers, and Durham Police Department. Interview script 1. Who is the gatekeeper of your community? 2. What is the socioeconomic status of most people in your community? 3. What are the main problems in the community? 4. Do you think violence is an issue? Yes/No? Probe- could you tell me more about why you think it’s an issue? 5. What do you think caused these problems? 6. How do you think these problems can be reduced or eliminated? 7. Are there any special health problems or issues affecting youth in the community? Yes/No? Probe- Please explain more? 8. Which one of the previous problems feel like most important one in the community? Probe- Please explain why you feel this is the most important problem? 9. If you were given 1 million dollars to correct health of the community what would you spend it on? 10. Is there anything else you would like to say about your community that I did not ask about? Citations CDC. (2013). Youth violence facts at a glance. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/yv-datasheet-a.pdf Old House magazine. (2009, June 23). East Durham named one of America’s “best old-house neighborhoods” by this old house. Retrieved from http://www.bullcityrising.com/2009/06/east-durham-named-one-of-americas-best-oldhouse-neighborhoods-by-this-old-house.html U.S. Census Bureau. (2013). Durham county, North Carolina. Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/37/37063.html YRBS. (2013). 2013 Durham high school youth risk behavior survey (yrbs) detailed data report. Retrieved from http://www.healthydurham.org/docs/YRBS 2013 High School Data Tables.pdf

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